14+ Positive Purposes Of Writing

One of the things I heard the most during my teaching experience was, “How does this relate to my future?” and typically students would say this in relation to learning how to read Shakespeare, writing research papers, or something that wasn’t ‘blatantly’ relevant to the contemporary world.

I would always tell them that English (especially writing and reading) were two of the most important and fundamental skills for survival. I would talk about resume-writing, job applications, sending emails, etc. – all the relevant ways we use our English-based skills every single day. Sometimes they would nod in agreement, or stand there silently taking note, or wrinkle their nose in aggravation that they hadn’t stumped me.

What I’ve learned, however, is that writing is not only essential, it’s actually beautiful. Since leaving the education world and diving headfirst into writing and editing for my full-time career, I’ve realized how valuable writing has been to me, and want to share that with you in hopes that you can encourage both yourself, and your students. Continue reading

The Forgotten Criterion – Making Writing Interesting

I stumbled across this article today and just had to share. Something that’s so relevant for teachers (especially English teachers) is that ‘blah’ feeling we get when we know we have a large stack of papers to grade. Don’t get me wrong, as educators we love seeing our students improve and reading their work…but at the same time, knowing you have a (often very dry and very large) pile to get through can be daunting and tiring before the task even begins!

That’s why when I stumbled upon Ken Lindblom’s blog post, I thought, ‘Wow, how could I have missed something so simple, and yet so important?’ And that’s the importance of interest in our students’ papers. Continue reading

My Hamburger Narrative

The focus of my sixth grade classes is narrative writing: short stories about the student’s own lives. To help with the structure of writing a short story, we explained a hamburger model of writing–the buns are the topic and concluding sentences, the meat is the essential components of the story, and the condiments are the supporting details, evidence, and sensory details! Continue reading